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The Constitution of the United States of America
The most unique form of government providing liberty and the Rule of Law, not of man

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America's God and Country: Encyclopedia of Quotations :"After reviewing an estimated 15,000 items, including newspaper articles, pamphlets, books, monographs, etc., written between 1760-1805 by the 55 men who wrote the constitution, Professors Donald S. Lutz and Charles S. Hyneman, in their work 'The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought' revealed that the Bible, especially the book of Deuteronomy, contributed 34% of all quotations used by our Founding Fathers."2 "Additional sources the founders quoted took 60% of their quotes from the Bible. Direct and indirect citations combined reveal that the majority of all quotations referenced by the Founding Fathers are derived from the Bible."3

1. Florida v. City of Tampa, 48 So. 2d 78 (Fla. 1950); see also Commissioners of Johnson County v. Lacy, 93 S.E. 482, 487 (N.C. 1917) ("Our laws are founded upon the Decalogue).
2. William J. Federer, The Ten Commandments & their Influence on American Law (Amerisearch Inc. St. Louis, MO. 2003) p.19.
3. Ibid; p.19. Federer's sources are as follows: Donald S. Lutz and Charles S. Hyneman, "The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought." American Political Science Review 189 (1984): 189-197. (Courtesy of Dr. Wayne House of Dallas Theological Seminary.) John Eidsmoe, Christianity and the Constitution -The Faith of Our Founding Fathers (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, A Mott Meida Book, 1987; 6th printing, 1993), pp. 51-53. Origions of American Constitutionalism, (1987). Stephen K. McDowell and Mark A. Beliles, America's Providential History (Charlottesville, VA: Providence Press, 1988), p. 156.


Below:
o The U. S. Constitution & The Federalist Papers
o First Prayer in Congress
o Further Resources

 

See also:
o
A Kid’s Guide to Constitutional Law If you asked someone what the three most important documents are in U.S. history, one of them would surely be the Constitution. This document outlines how our government works, what legal rights we have, how the government works, and even the way that we can change the Constitution as our country changes. Today, a lots our laws are tied to the Constitution and how we interpret it. Games and Lessons: Rebuild the Bill of Rights, Branch-O-Mania, Lesson: Constitution for Kids, Do I Have a Right?, Power Play, That’s Your Right, Who Is Your Founding Father?, Bill of Rights Match Game, Constitution Quiz, The Creation of the Bill of Rights, Name That Founding Father, Checks and Balances, Life Without the Bill of Rights, Talking About My Constitution, Court Quest

o America's Foundation: The Declaration of Independence premised on "the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God." The Constitution is not a "living document."

o Did You Know?  Learn what you have not been taught and/or mislead about America's Heritage
o Comprehensive Government Resource Page
o Religious Affiliation of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America
o The Founding Fathers and Jesus
o The Bible and Government Biblical Principles: Basis for America's Laws
o Declaration of Independence (Archives.gov)
o United States Constitution (Archives.gov)

o Public Administration Explained: Branches of the US Government - The United States Constitution established the nation’s current system of government when it was signed in 1787. The government consists of three branches, and the power of the government is divided between them in a system of checks and balances so that no one branch is too powerful. The executive, legislative, and judicial branches work together to keep our government running smoothly and efficiently.
o The Three Branches of the United States Government - By Brian Joslyn - This article discusses the three branches of government in a really simplistic way. Easy for middle school and high school students to understand.

o The Myth of Three Co-Equal Branches of Government [VIDEO] James Madison, known as the father of the Constitution, stated in Federalist Paper 51:L “In republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates. The remedy for this inconveniency is to divide the legislature into different branches.” ...Congress’ authority predominates, which is why we have divided the power into two branches. ...If we place the number of authorities of each Branch found in the Constitution, we see the scale disproportionate with the Legislative Branch having roughly forty-eight powers, followed by the Executive Branch with roughly twelve powers, and in last place the Judicial Branch with roughly three powers. ...To add further credibility to the discriminate powers of Congress, we find they have power to impeach ANY member of the other two branches!

o What is the Federal Reserve? (Video 0:2:19)



The Constitution is an expression of the Declaration of Independence.

In the same manner as Jesus proclaimed, "On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.," the Constitution and Bill of Rights hang on Jefferson's first two paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence.

The Constitution's primary author, James Madison, wrote Thomas Jefferson on 8 February 1825, these words concerning the supremacy of the Declaration of Independence over our nation's Constitution:

"On the distinctive principles of the Government...of the U. States, the best guides are to be found in...The Declaration of Independence, as the fundamental Act of Union of these States."

"Cursed be all that learning that is contrary to the cross of Christ." --James Madison, Primary Author of the U. S. Constitution and 4th U.S. president. America's Providential History, p. 93

President James Madison, June 20, 1785 - "Before any man can be considered as a member of Civilized Society, he must first be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe."

James Madison also wrote, "The belief in a God All Powerful wise and good, is so essential to the moral order of the world and to the happiness of man, that arguments which enforce it cannot be drawn from too many sources nor adapted with too much solicitude to the different characters and capacities impressed with it." In a letter to Frederick Beasley.

"The equal right of every citizen to the free exercise of his Religion according to the dictates of conscience" is held by the same tenure with all our other rights."  --James Madison "Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments"

On July 3, 1776, Founding Patriot John Adams wrote to his beloved wife, Abigail: Yesterday, the greatest question was decided, which ever was debated in America, and a greater, perhaps, never was or will be decided among men. You will see in a few days a Declaration setting forth the causes which have impelled us to this mighty revolution, and the reasons which will justify it in the sight of God and man. ... It ought to be commemorated as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shews, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one end of this Continent to the other from this time forward forever more. You will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not. I am well aware of the Toil and Blood and Treasure, that it will cost us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet through all the Gloom I can see the Rays of ravishing Light and Glory. I can see that the End is more than worth all the Means. And that Posterity will triumph in that Day's Transaction.

"We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all of our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind of self-government; upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God." James Madison (1751-1836) Father of the Constitution, 4th President of the United States

The Constitution is not a “living document,” but the Rule of Law of foundational principals. The Constitution is a blueprint for these United States. Did the creators of our Constitution realize changes may at times be needed? Yes, and it has been amended 17 times since the first 10 amendments, the Bill of Rights, which were enacted shortly after the states ratified the Constitution. Within its original 4,400 words is the process for changing the Constitution and it is a difficult process, by design, so that changes would have to be very strongly supported by the states. Neither those original words nor those of the amendments authorize changes to be made by judges or by five Supreme Court justices. As the word “Constitution” itself means “structure” and that structure provides a solid foundation, not one built on flexible sand.

You’ve Heard the Constitution Is a Living Document – You Heard Wrong - By Bryan Fischer - ...Here’s the foundational point: if we want to change the Constitution for whatever reason - say, for instance, because our societal values have changed on slavery, the election of senators, the income tax, women’s suffrage, or alcohol - we change the Constitution. We amend it. We don’t ignore it, pretend it doesn’t say what it clearly says, or ask the Supreme Court to amend it for us through judicial imposition.

   How to interpret the Constitution: I write not as a lawyer but as an ordinary American who can read. The Founders, after all, did not write the Constitution for legal scholars. They wrote it in ordinary, plain English for ordinary Americans like you and me. Nor am I writing for legal scholars, although they all should agree with the views expressed in this column. No, I am writing not only as an ordinary American who can read but also for other ordinary Americans who can read.

   I follow the wisdom of Thomas Jefferson in his advice to Judge William Johnson on interpreting the Constitution: “On every question of construction (of the Constitution) let us carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit of the debates, and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text, or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed.” If we do not understand the Constitution as the Founders intended it to be understood, we do not understand it at all.

And if we don’t understand it as the Founders intended it to be understood, then the Constitution can mean anything the untethered minds of the Court can construe it to mean. In a letter to Spencer Roan in 1819, Jefferson addressed the conceit that the Constitution does not mean what the Founders meant but whatever the Supreme Court decides it means. “The constitution, on this hypothesis, is a mere thing of wax in the hands of the judiciary, which they may twist, and shape into any form they please.”


The U. S. Constitution

See: The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription

The Ten Commandments & Their Influence on American Law - A Study in History - By William J. Federer - "After reviewing an estimated 15,000 items, including newspaper articles, pamphlets, books, monographs, etc., written between 1760-1805 by the 55 men who wrote the constitution, Professors Donald S. Lutz and Charles S. Hyneman, in their work 'The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought' revealed that the Bible, especially the book of Deuteronomy, contributed 34% of all quotations used by our Founding Fathers."2 "Additional sources the founders quoted took 60% of their quotes from the Bible. Direct and indirect citations combined reveal that the majority of all quotations referenced by the Founding Fathers are derived from the Bible."3

1. Florida v. City of Tampa, 48 So. 2d 78 (Fla. 1950); see also Commissioners of Johnson County v. Lacy, 93 S.E. 482, 487 (N.C. 1917) ("Our laws are founded upon the Decalogue).
2. William J. Federer, The Ten Commandments & their Influence on American Law (Amerisearch Inc. St. Louis, MO. 2003) p.19.
3. Ibid; p.19. Federer's sources are as follows: Donald S. Lutz and Charles S. Hyneman, "The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought." American Political Science Review 189 (1984): 189-197. (Courtesy of Dr. Wayne House of Dallas Theological Seminary.) John Eidsmoe, Christianity and the Constitution -The Faith of Our Founding Fathers (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, A Mott Meida Book, 1987; 6th printing, 1993), pp. 51-53. Origions of American Constitutionalism, (1987). Stephen K. McDowell and Mark A. Beliles, America's Providential History (Charlottesville, VA: Providence Press, 1988), p. 156.

At the Constitutional Convention of 1787, James Madison proposed the plan to divide the central government into three branches: a) JUDICIAL, b) LEGISLATIVE, and c) EXECUTIVE. He discovered this model of government from the Perfect Governor, as he read Isaiah 33:22; "For the LORD is our judge, the LORD is our lawgiver, the LORD is our king; He will save us."

The Bill of Rights - On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States proposed 12 amendments to the Constitution. The 1789 Joint Resolution of Congress proposing the amendments is on display in the Rotunda in the National Archives Museum. Ten of the proposed 12 amendments were ratified by three-fourths of the state legislatures on December 15, 1791. The ratified Articles (Articles 3–12) constitute the first 10 amendments of the Constitution, or the U.S. Bill of Rights. In 1992, 203 years after it was proposed, Article 2 was ratified as the 27th Amendment to the Constitution. Article 1 was never ratified.

The First Amendment - Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or (1) prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or (2) abridging the freedom of speech, or (3) of the press; or (4) the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and (5) to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

The Constitution Made Easy By Mike Holler not only offers a modernized version for easier reading; it actually makes the meaning of the original seem to jump off the page! Using a side-by-side format prevents readers from having to continuously jump back and forth to keep up with the Constitutional changes.

"Hold on, my friends, to the Constitution and to the Republic for which it stands. Miracles do not cluster and what has happened once in 6,000 years, may not happen again. Hold on to the Constitution, for if the American Constitution should fail, there will be anarchy throughout the world." --Daniel Webster (1782-1852) Author, Lawyer and Patriot 

"Our peculiar security is in the possession of a written Constitution. Let us not make it a blank paper by construction." --Thomas Jefferson, letter to Wilson Nicholas, 1803

"The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined.  Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite."  James Madison (Primary author of the Constitution), Federalist No. 45

"The only foundation of a free constitution is pure virtue; and if this cannot be inspired into our people in a greater measure than they have it now, they may change their rulers and the forms of government, but they will not obtain a lasting liberty. They will only exchange tyrants and tyrannies."  John Adams

"The nature of the encroachment upon American constitution is such, as to grow every day more and more encroaching. Like a cancer; it eats faster and faster every hour. The revenue creates pensioners, and the pensioners urge for more revenue. The people grow less steady, spirited and virtuous, the seekers more numerous and more corrupt, and every day increases the circles of their dependents and expectants, until virtue, integrity, public spirit, simplicity and frugality become the objects of ridicule and scorn, and vanity, luxury, foppery, selfishness, meanness, and downright venality swallow up the whole of society." --John Adams

"The first and almost the only Book deserving of universal attention is the Bible. Our Constitution was made for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other." John Quincy Adams

"[T]he only foundation for a useful education in a republic is to be laid in religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments." Benjamin Rush (1806)

"If I could have entertained the slightest apprehension that the constitution framed by the Convention . . . might possibly endanger the religious rights of any ecclesiastical society, certainly I would never have placed my signature to it."  George Washington

"Nothing is more certain than that a general profligacy and corruption of manners make a people ripe for destruction. A good form of government may hold the rotten materials together for some time, but beyond a certain pitch, even the best constitution will be ineffectual, and slavery must ensue."  John Witherspoon

"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,  it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government."  Patrick Henry

"The Constitution is a mere thing of wax in the hands of the judiciary, which they may twist and shape into any form they please." Thomas Jefferson

"I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground that 'all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states or to the people.' To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take possession of a boundless field of power, not longer susceptible of any definition." Thomas Jefferson

"In questions of power, then, let no more be said of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution." Thomas Jefferson

"You seem...to consider the judges as the ultimate arbiters of all Constitutional questions: a very dangerous doctrine indeed, and one, which would place us under the despotism of an oligarchy. Our judges are as honest as other men, and not more so. They have, with others, the same passions for party, for power, and the privilege of their corps. ...And their power (is) the more dangerous, as they are in office for life and not responsible, as the other functionaries are, to the elective control. The Constitution has erected no such single tribunal, knowing that to whatever hands confided, with the corruptions of time and party, its members would become despots."  Thomas Jefferson

"The liberties of our country, the freedom of our civil Constitution, are worth defending at all hazards; and it is our duty to defend them against all attacks. We have received them as a fair inheritance from our worthy ancestors: they purchased them for us with toil and danger and expense of treasure and blood, and transmitted them to us with care and diligence. It will bring an everlasting mark of infamy on the present generation, enlightened as it is, if we should suffer them to be wrested from us by violence without a struggle, or to be cheated out of them by the artifices of false and designing men." --Samuel Adams

"If we and our posterity...live always in the fear of God and shall respect His Commandments...we may have the highest hopes of the future fortunes of our country.... But if we...neglect religious instruction and authority; violate the rules of eternal justice, trifle with the injunctions of morality, and recklessly destroy the constitution which holds us together, no man can tell how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us and bury all our glory in profound obscurity." Daniel Webster: Addressing the New York Historical Society, 1852

See also: The Constitutional Convention - Gordon Lloyd, a professor at Pepperdine University, has constructed the best, most comprehensive and user-friendly resource on the Constitutional Convention debates available on the web


The Federalist Papers - If you've ever wanted an easy-to-read translation of the "The Federalist Papers," then "The Federalist Papers: Modern English Edition Two" by Mary E Webster is for you.

Book is considered 10th grade reading level and includes:

* United States Constitution

* All 85 Federalist Papers

* Expanded universal Federalist Papers index

The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the collective pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. The collection was commonly known as The Federalist until the name The Federalist Papers emerged in the 20th century.


Congressman Forbes asks the questions "Did America ever consider itself a Judeo-Christian nation?" and "If America was once a Judeo-Christian nation, when did it cease to be?" on the floor of the US House. (4m28s video)


Courtesy Library of CongressFirst Prayer in Congress

As recorded in the Journals of the Continental Congress the Rev. Mr. Jacob Duche, an Episcopal clergyman, was invited to open the First Congress with prayer which was held in Carpenters' Hall in Philadelphia, PA. The Rev. Mr. Duche first read Psalms 35 from the Psalter for the Seventh day of September, 1774, then proceeded to extemporaneously pray the following prayer:

"Be Thou present O God of Wisdom, and direct the counsel of this Honorable Assembly; enable them to settle all things on the best and surest foundations; that the scene of blood may be speedily closed; that Order, Harmony and Peace may be effectually restored, and that Truth and Justice, Religion and Piety, prevail and flourish among the people. Preserve the health of their bodies, and the vigor of their minds, shower down on them, and the millions they here represent, such temporal blessings as Thou seeth expedient for them in this world, and crown them with everlasting Glory in the world to come. All this we ask in the Name and through the merits of Jesus Christ, Thy Son and our Savior, Amen."

Washington was kneeling there, and Henry, Randolph, Rutledge, Lee, and Jay, and by their side there stood bowed in reverence, the Puritan Patriots of New England, who at that moment had reason to believe that an armed soldiery was wasting their humble households. It was believed that Boston had been bombarded and destroyed.

They prayed fervently "for America, for Congress, for the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and especially for the town of Boston," and who can realize the emotion with which they turned imploringly to Heaven for Divine interposition and - "It was enough" says Mr. Adams, "to melt a heart of stone. I saw the tears gush into the eyes of the old, grave pacific Quakers of Philadelphia."


Further Resources:

Here follows, in alphabetical order, a small sample of how other notable Founders expressed their faith. By Mark Alexander

John Adams: The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God. ... The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity and humanity.

Samuel Adams: I [rely] upon the merits of Jesus Christ for a pardon of all my sins. ... I conceive we cannot better express ourselves than by humbly supplicating the Supreme Ruler of the world ... bringing in the holy and happy period when the kingdoms of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be everywhere established, and the people willingly bow to the scepter of Him who is the Prince of Peace. ... We may with one heart and voice humbly implore His gracious and free pardon through Jesus Christ, supplicating His Divine aid ... [and] above all to cause the religion of Jesus Christ, in its true spirit, to spread far and wide till the whole earth shall be filled with His glory.

John Hancock: That the spiritual kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be continually increasing until the whole earth shall be filled with His glory.

Patrick Henry: Being a Christian ... is a character which I prize far above all this world has or can boast. ... The Bible is a book worth more than all the other books that were ever printed. ... This is all the inheritance I can give to my dear family. The religion of Christ can give them one, which will make them rich indeed.

John Jay: Condescend, merciful Father! to grant as far as proper these imperfect petitions, to accept these inadequate thanksgivings, and to pardon whatever of sin hath mingled in them for the sake of Jesus Christ, our blessed Lord and Savior; unto Whom, with Thee, and the blessed Spirit, ever one God, be rendered all honor and glory, now and forever. ... The Bible is the best of all books, for it is the word of God and teaches us the way to be happy in this world and in the next. Continue therefore to read it and to regulate your life by its precepts. ... Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation, to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.

Thomas Jefferson: I am a Christian in the only sense in which He wished anyone to be: sincerely attached to His doctrines in preference to all others. ... I am a real Christian -- that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ.

James Madison: I have sometimes thought there could not be a stronger testimony in favor of religion or against temporal enjoyments, even the most rational and manly, than for men who occupy the most honorable and gainful departments and [who] are rising in reputation and wealth, publicly to declare their unsatisfactoriness by becoming fervent advocates in the cause of Christ.

I saved my favorite quote on Christmas for last: "How many observe Christ's birth-day! How few, his precepts! O! 'tis easier to keep Holidays than Commandments." --Benjamin Franklin (1743)

My point in listing these snippets of wisdom from our Founders is to make the case plain that the Left's proscription on the expression of faith, censorship that is antithetical to the very existence of our Constitution and Liberty, will not cease until such expressions have been expelled from all public venues and forums. Then, and only then, can the rule of men fully supersede the Rule of Law. 

The extinction of Deism: Historical riddle solved & lessons for today By Fred Hutchison - Deism had a rapid rise to popularity and an even more rapid fall into oblivion. The rapid extinction of the once popular and politically influential Deism in the early nineteenth century is an old riddle of history -- which has now been solved by Avery Cardinal Dulles with important lessons for today. Deism is the belief that after God created the world and gave man reason, He retreated and left man to fend for himself, trusting man to use reason to solve all His problems. Man was expected to use reason to discover the laws of nature and employ them for his benefit and to discover the Universal Moral Law and obey it. Mainstream Deism included a Last Judgment based upon the individual's obedience or disobedience to the moral law. Some Deists believed in divine providence, but not in answers to prayer or miracles.

The rise of Deism Deism was invented in the late seventeenth century in England and was inspired by the philosophers and scientists of the Age of Reason. Deism was probably the inspiration for the creation of Masonry (or Freemasonry) in England in the early eighteenth century. Contrary to many popular myths and slanders about Masonry, mainstream English and American Masonry is essentially a form of Deism in its relationship to God and its rationalistic, moralistic, fraternal, and philanthropic character. It is not Christian, but welcomes all monotheists including Christians as members. Masonry is a quaint vestige of the now extinct eighteenth century quasi-religion/philosophy of Deism. ...The extinction of Deism Avery Cardinal Dulles provided seven reasons for the collapse of Deism in The Deist Minimum published in the bimonthly First Things. I have deduced six additional reasons. First, let's hear from the Cardinal. (Click here for the 13 reasons.)

David Barton of Wallbuilders.com is an historian who speaks around the country to share the truth about the American founding, using the original writings of the Founders. This information is no longer presented in our public schools, but it was for the first 200+ centuries of our nation's existence.

ConSource.org: Founders Drafts of the Constitution Founders' Drafts of the Constitution Manuscripts added to ConSource.org There is a new ConSource collection up on ConSource.org. We have added the Founder's Drafts of the Constitution, a wonderful collection of the unique edits and notes George Washington, John Dickenson, and James Wilson took at the Constitutional Convention of 1787. We encourage visitors to get on ConSource.org and to view the images of these original manuscripts click here. We will continue to add other various delegates notes as well as the transcriptions of those already posted.

How the Ten Commandments are expressed in civil Law in American History

In America's Beginning, Students and Politicians Studied the Bible

Heritage Foundation scholar Joe Postell has helpfully rounded up resources for citizens to learn about the nation's highest law. September 17 is Constitution Day. On this date in 1787, 39 of the original 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the document that would eventually be ratified and enshrined as our fundamental law. Recently, many have observed the relative decline of civic knowledge among American citizens, and have taken steps to improve our understanding of our fundamental law, the limited government which it creates, and the basic liberties which it is designed to protect.

Republic vs. Democracy - (Video 10:35) "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" - The American Form of Government (More: Republic vs. Democracy)

Freedom of Expression - National Paralegal College Constitutional Law & Criminal Procedure - First Amendment: The relevant portion of the First Amendment, passed in 1791, reads "Congress shall make no law" abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble ...Clearly there must be some limits on the freedom of expression, and these will be explored in detail later in this Chapter. Not every example of expression which is subject to First Amendment protection will be permissible in every context.