EarsToHear.net
He That Has Ears To Hear, Let Him Hear
 (Matthew 11:15-30)
Challenging both secular wisdom and religious doctrines. - Will our descendants know moral virtue?

Home | About | Search | Newsletter | Contact


Quotes from America's Leaders

Also on EarsToHear.net:  Leading By Example & Warnings from the wise

Additional Resources:
-> The Heritage Foundation's Founders Almanac
-> Quotes on the Constitution
-> FREE eBook "Quotes From Our Founding Fathers Volume 1" - Compiled by Steve Straub - www.thefederalistpapers.org - Volume 1 is an extensive 90 page compilation of quotes from George Washington, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Thomas Paine.
-> WallBuilders Confirmed Quotes WallBuilders has been able to track many of these popular quotations back to original sources. 

-> Warnings Ignored: Quotes from the Founders and more...

Back to Heritage Index


Foundation

Upfront: The quotes listed below are a product of a foundation, built not on sand, but the solid ground of a moral virtue that comes only from a Biblical worldview. This moral virtue was what America's founders and leaders, who exhibited this righteous courage, acted upon in their fervent passion to address and resolve EVERY issue they confronted, domestic or foreign, small or large. Their house was not built on the sand of political correctness, but upon the Kingdom of God, where, if men chose the righteousness aligned with the Creator's authority (the Word of God), it would naturally lead to a liberty that comes from God, and not on the whims of faulty human wisdom. They preferred being partakers of a divine nature over that of a sinful human nature. Once one grasps the principles and precepts of the Kingdom of God, one can come to appreciate not only what America's founders accomplished, but also the teachings, parables, and prayers of their Lord, Jesus Christ, as did His disciples.

From the author of the U.S. Constitution: "Whilst we assert for ourselves a freedom to embrace, to profess, and to observe the religion which we believe to be of divine origin, we cannot deny an equal freedom to those whose minds have not yet yielded to the evidence which has convinced us. If this freedom be abused, it is an offence against God, not against man: To God therefore, not to men, must an account of it be rendered."  James Madison, Memorial and Remonstrance (More at Theocracy?)

See What is the Kingdom of God? as opposed to "religions" and governments of men. Jesus did not come to establish a religion. He came to announce the arrival of the Kingdom of Heaven, where man was to regain Biblical righteous dominion over the earth (Genesis 1:2-3, 2:4-6, 1:26, Romans 8:19-21).

Democracy without God is man's worship and elevation of himself and his own intelligence or humanism, where man becomes his own measure for morality, judgment, and justice. Myles Munroe Kingdom Principles

David Barton of Wallbuilders.com is an historian who speaks around the country to share the truth about the American founding, using the original writings of the Founders. This information is no longer presented in our public schools, but it was for the first 200+ centuries of our nation's existence. Here are the You Tube links where you can hear this history, in the Founders' words. I hope you'll share this with others after viewing, even to Deists.
--- http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F53E14803F7CF0DD&search_query=david+barton+wallbuilders  
--- Is America A Christian Nation? (1 of 5)
--- Is America A Christian Nation? (2 of 5)
--- Is America A Christian Nation? (3 of 5)
--- Is America A Christian Nation? (4 of 5)
--- Is America A Christian Nation? (5 of 5)


American Minute with Bill Federer August 21 - He was one of six founding fathers to sign both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. President Washington appointed him to the Supreme Court. Born in Scotland, he was an active delegate at the Constitutional Convention, speaking 168 times. His name was James Wilson and he died AUGUST 21, 1798. The first law professor of the University of Pennsylvania, James Wilson wrote in his Lectures on Law, 1789-91: "Law...communicated to us by reason and conscience...has been called natural; as promulgated by the holy scriptures, it has been  called revealed...But it should always be remembered, that this law, natural or revealed...flows from the same divine source; it is the law of God." James Wilson continued: "Human law must rest its authority, ultimately, upon the authority of that law, which is divine." The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania records in Updegraph v. Commonwealth, 1824: "The late Judge James Wilson, of the Supreme Court of the United States, Professor of Law in the College in Philadelphia...for our present form of government we are greatly indebted to his exertions...In his Course of Lectures (3d Vol. of his Works, 122), he states that...'Christianity is part of the common-law.'"

The father of the American space program died JUNE 16, 1977. He developed the famed V-2 rocket for Germany before emigrating to the US, where in 1958, he launched America's first satellite. He became the director of NASA, the U.S. guided missile program and founded the National Space Institute. His name was Wernher von Braun, and he stated: "The laws of nature that enable us to fly to the Moon also enable us to destroy our home planet with the atom bomb. Science itself does not address the question whether we should use the power at our disposal for good or for evil. The guidelines of what we ought to do are furnished in the moral law of God." Wernher von Braun continued: "It is no longer enough that we pray that God may be with us on our side. We must learn to pray that we may be on God's side." In the foreword to his Anthology on the Creation and Design exhibited in Nature, Wernher von Braun stated: "Viewing the awesome reaches of space...should only confirm our belief in the certainty of its Creator. I find it difficult to understand a scientist who does not acknowledge the presence of a superior rationality behind the existence of the universe." American Minute June 16th

(Note to secular humanist Democrats: Before inaccurately and inadequately dismissing these pages falsely as promoting theocracy, see Theocracy? Numerous blog discussions and commentaries have weakly dismissed the HISTORY presented here as promoting a theocracy as an excuse to escape and avoid the challenge to secular wisdom. BTW - What new and improved foundation do secular humanists use to justify violating "the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God?")

John Witherspoon, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Member of the Continental Congress, President of Princeton College and Pastor. Spoken in a sermon delivered May 17, 1776. "He is the best friend of American liberty who is most sincere and active in promoting true and undefiled religion and who sets Himself with the greatest firmness to bear down profanity and immorality of every kind...God grant that in America true religion and civil liberty may be inseparable and that the unjust attempts to destroy the one, may in the issue tend to the support and establishment of both."

Edmund Burke: "What is liberty without...virtue? It is...madness, without restraint. Men are qualified for liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites."

George Washington "Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that National morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle."

Benjamin Franklin in a pamphlet for Europeans titled "Information to Those Who Would Remove to America," 1754. "Atheism is unknown there; Infidelity rare and secret; so that persons may live to a great age in that country without having their piety shocked by meeting with either an Atheist or an Infidel. And the Divine Being seems...pleased to favor the whole country."

On APRIL 16, 1859, French historian Alexis de Tocqueville died. After nine months of traveling the United States, he wrote Democracy in America in 1835, which has been described as "the most comprehensive...analysis of character and society in America ever written." Alexis de Tocqueville wrote: "Upon my arrival in the United States the religious aspect of the country was the first thing that struck my attention...In France I had almost always seen the spirit of religion and the spirit of freedom marching in opposite directions. But in America I found they were intimately united." De Tocqueville continued: "The Americans combine the notions of Christianity and of liberty so intimately in their minds, that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without the other...They brought with them into the New World a form of Christianity which I cannot better describe than by styling it a democratic and republican religion." In Book Two of Democracy in America, de Tocqueville wrote: "Christianity has therefore retained a strong hold on the public mind in America...In the United States...Christianity itself is a fact so irresistibly established, that no one undertakes either to attack or to defend it." American Minute for April 16th.


"We are all called upon by the highest obligations of duty to renew our thanks and our devotion to our Heavenly Parent, who has continued to vouchsafe to us the eminent blessings which surround us and who has so signally crowned the year with His goodness.  If we find ourselves increasing beyond example in numbers, in strength, in wealth, in knowledge, in everything which promotes human an social happiness, let us ever remember our dependence for all these on the protecting and merciful dispensations of Divine Providence." John Tyler, December 7, 1841

"No man can study the movement of modern civilization from an impartial standpoint and not realize that Christianity and the spread of Christianity are the basis of hope of modern civilization in the growth of popular self-government. The spirit of Christianity is pure democracy. It is equality of man before God, the equality of man before the law, which is, as I understand it, the most God-like manifestation that man has been able to make." William Howard Taft, in an address to a missionary gathering in 1908

"I have one great political idea. . . . That idea is an old one. It is widely and generally assented to; nevertheless, it is very generally trampled upon and disregarded. The best expression of it, I have found in the Bible. It is in substance, "Righteousness exalteth a nation; sin is a reproach to any people" [Proverbs 14:34]. This constitutes my politics - the negative and positive of my politics, and the whole of my politics. . . . I feel it my duty to do all in my power to infuse this idea into the public mind." - The Rev. Frederick Douglass


In direct opposition to humanism the quote collection below reveals the Biblical foundation of a moral virtue.

George Washington -- "Human happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected."

"To the distinguished character of patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian."

"Let it simply be asked where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths, which are the instruments of investigation in the Courts of Justice?  And let us with caution indulge the opposition, that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that National morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle."

"[I]f we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known, that we are at all times ready for War."

"It is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the Providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and to humbly implore His protection and favor." October 3, 1789 Proclaiming a National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving.

In 1778 George Washington wrote a letter to Thomas Nelson, Jr. citing God's divine intervention in the founding of our nation. "The hand of providence has been so conspicuous in all this, that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith, and more than wicked, that has not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obligations."

"It is impossible to govern the world without God and the Bible. Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness - these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked, where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are instruments of investigation in courts of justice?"

"And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principles." Farewell Address as published in the American Daily Advertiser on September 17, 1796.

"The General is sorry to be informed that the foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing, a vice hitherto little known in our American Army is growing into fashion. He hopes that the officers will, by example as well as influence, endeavor to check it and that both they and the men will reflect that we can little hope of the blessing of Heaven on our army if we insult it by our impiety and folly. Added to this it is a vice so mean and low without any temptation that every man of sense and character detests and despises it."

"If I could have entertained the slightest apprehension that the constitution framed by the Convention . . . might possibly endanger the religious rights of any ecclesiastical society, certainly I would never have placed my signature to it."

"[A] good moral character is the first essential in a man... and your conduct here may stamp your character through life. It is therefore highly important that you should endeavor not only to be learned but virtuous."

"Direct my thoughts, words, and work. Wash away my sins in the immaculate Blood of the Lamb, and purge my heart by thy Holy Spirit....Daily frame me more and more into the likeness of Thy Son Jesus Christ." From George Washington's private prayer book.


Ben Franklin - "I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it."

"That wise Men have in all Ages thought Government necessary for the Good of Mankind; and, that wise Governments have always thought Religion necessary for the well ordering and well-being of Society, and accordingly have been ever careful to encourage and protect the Ministers of it, paying them the highest publick Honours, that their Doctrines might thereby meet with the greater Respect among the common People."

 On APRIL 17, 1790, the son of a poor candle-maker died. The 15th of 17 children, he apprenticed as a printer, and published a popular almanac. He retired at age 42, then taught himself five languages, invented the rocking chair, bifocal glasses, and the lighting rod, which earned him degrees from Harvard and Yale. He helped found the University of Pennsylvania, a hospital, America's first postal system and fire department. He became the governor of Pennsylvania, signed the Declaration of Independence and called for prayer at the Constitutional Convention. He was also president of America's first anti-slavery society. His name was Ben Franklin. In his Poor Richard's Almanac, May 1757, Ben Franklin wrote: "Work as if you were to live 100 years; pray as if you were to die tomorrow." In a pamphlet for Europeans titled "Information to Those Who Would Remove to America," 1754, Benjamin Franklin wrote: "Atheism is unknown there; Infidelity rare and secret; so that persons may live to a great age in that country without having their piety shocked by meeting with either an Atheist or an Infidel. And the Divine Being seems...pleased to favor the whole country." American Minute

"Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters." April 17, 1787

See Did You Know? to learn America's Constitution Convention was embroiled in a bitter debate over how each state was to be represented in the new government and what Benjamin Franklin, at age 81, presented to resolve this impasse of this First Congress.


Samuel Adams - "And if we now cast our eyes over the nations of the earth, we shall find that, instead of possessing the pure religion of the Gospel, they may be divided either into infidels, who deny the truth; or politicians who make religion a stalking horse for their ambition; or professors, who walk in the trammels of orthodoxy, and are more attentive to traditions and ordinances of men than to the oracles of truth."

"We have this day restored the Sovereign to whom all men ought to be obedient. He reigns in heaven and from the rising to the setting of the sun, let His kingdom come."

"First of all, I ... rely upon the merits of Jesus Christ for a pardon of all my sins." The Rights of the Colonists was widely circulated in 1772. In it he wrote, "The right to freedom being the gift of the Almighty. The rights of the colonists as Christians may be best understood by reading and carefully studying the institution of The Great Law Giver and Head of the Christian Church, which are to be found clearly written and promulgated in the New Testament."  

"With true repentance and contrition of Heart, we may unitedly implore the forgiveness of our Sins, through the merits of Jesus Christ, and humbly supplicate our Heavenly Father, to grant us the aids of his Grace, for the amendment of our Hearts and Lives, and vouchsafe his smiles upon our temporal concerns." Feb. 28, 1795, proclamation, issued while he was Massachusetts governor.


Patrick Henry"It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the gospel of Jesus Christ.  For this very reason peoples of other faiths have been afforded asylum, prosperity, and freedom of worship here." 


John Adams - The American Bible Society was started by an act of Congress and John Adams, our second president, served as its first leader.

"We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other." 1798 - Address to the Military

"That they call to mind our numerous offense against the Most High God, confess them before Him with the sincerest penitence, implore His pardoning mercy, through the Great Mediator and Redeemer, for our past transgressions, and that through the grace of His Holy Spirit, we may be disposed and enable to yield a more suitable obedience to His righteous requisitions in time to come." Proclamation of a National Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 6, 1799

"It is religion and morality alone which can establish the principles upon which freedom can securely stand. The only foundation of a free constitution is pure virtue."

"The safety and prosperity of nations ultimately and essentially depend on the protection and blessing of Almighty God."

"Men must be ready, they must pride themselves and be happy to sacrifice their private pleasures, passions and interests, nay,
their private friendships and dearest connections, when they stand in competition with the rights of society."

"Human government is more or less perfect as it approaches nearer or diverges farther from the imitation of this perfect plan of divine and moral government." John Adams, draft of a Newspaper Communication, Circa August 1770

"The only foundation of a free constitution is pure virtue; and if this cannot be inspired into our people in a greater measure than they have it now, they may change their rulers and the forms of government, but they will not obtain a lasting liberty. They will only exchange tyrants and tyrannies."

"The general principles on which the Fathers achieved independence were the only Principles in which that beautiful Assembly of young Gentlemen could Unite...And what were these general Principles? I answer, the general Principles of Christianity..." In an 1813 letter to Thomas Jefferson.

"Statesmen...may plan and speculate for Liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand.... The only foundation of a free Constitution, is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People, in a great Measure, than they have it now, They may change their Rulers, and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting Liberty."

"I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States.  Yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.  I can see that the end is worth more than all the means...." 

"The law given from Sinai was a civil and municipal code as well as a moral and religious code.  These are laws essential to the existence of men in society and most of which have been enacted by every Nation which ever professed any code of laws.  Vain indeed would be the search among the writings of secular history to find so broad, so complete and so solid a basis of morality as the Ten Commandments lay down." 

"It is the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the SUPREME BEING, the great Creator and  Preserver of the universe.  And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship."

"The moment the idea is admitted into society that property is not as sacred as the laws of God, and that there is not a force of law and public justice to protect it, anarchy and tyranny commence.  If 'Thou shalt not covet' and 'Thou shalt not steal' were not commandments of Heaven, they must be made inviolable precepts in every society before it can be civilized or made free."

"We ought to consider what is the end of government before we determine which is the best form. Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man....All sober inquirers after truth, ancient and modern, pagan and Christian, have declared that the happiness of man, as well as his dignity, consists in virtue." (Thoughts on Government, 1776)  Reference: Papers of John Adams, Butterfield, ed., vol. 4 (86)


John Quincy Adams - "The first and almost the only Book deserving of universal attention is the Bible. Our Constitution was made for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other."

"To the guidance of the legislative councils, to the assistance of the executive and subordinate departments, to the friendly cooperation of the respective State governments, to the candid and liberal support of the people so far as it may be deserved by honest industry and zeal, I shall look for whatever success may attend my public service; and knowing that "except the Lord keep the city the watchman waketh but in vain," with fervent supplications for His favor, to His overruling providence I commit with humble but fearless confidence my own fate and the future destinies of my country."

"The greatest glory of the American Revolution was this: It connected in one indissoluble bond the principles of civil government with the principles of Christianity."

"I speak as a man of the world to men of the world; and I say to you, 'Search the Scriptures!' The Bible is the book of all others, to be read at all ages, and in all conditions of human life."

"The highest glory of the American Revolution was this: it connected in one indissoluble bond the principles of civil government with the principles of Christianity. From the day of the Declaration...they were bound by the laws of God, which they all, and by the laws of the Gospel, which they nearly all, acknowledge as the rules of their conduct."

"My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ."

"The Sermon on the Mount commands me to lay up for myself treasures, not upon earth, but in Heaven. My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ" Dec. 24, 1814


Alexander Hamilton - "The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for, among old parchments, or musty records. They are written, as with a sun beam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the Divinity itself; and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power."


Andrew Jackson - "Go to the Scriptures... the joyful promises it contains will be a balsam to all your troubles."


Daniel Webster - "Liberty exists in proportion to wholesome restraint."

"If we abide by the principles taught in the Bible, our country will go on prospering and to prosper; but if we and our prosperity neglect its instructions and authority, no man can tell how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us and bury all our glory in profound obscurity. Lastly, our ancestors established their system of government on morality and religious sentiment. Moral habits, they believed, cannot safely be trusted on any other foundation than religious principle, nor any government be secure which is not supported by moral habits."

Addressing the New York Historical Society, 1852, Daniel Webster stated:  "If we and our posterity...live always in the fear of God and shall respect His Commandments...we may have the highest hopes of the future fortunes of our country.... But if we...neglect religious instruction and authority; violate the rules of eternal justice, trifle with the injunctions of morality, and recklessly destroy the constitution which holds us together, no man can tell how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us and bury all our glory in profound obscurity."


Thomas Jefferson - "God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are a gift of God? That they are not to violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever." - "Yes, we did produce a near perfect Republic. But will they keep it, or will they, in the enjoyment of plenty, lose the memory of freedom? Material abundance without character is the surest way to destruction."

"Reading, reflection and time have convinced me that the interests of society require the observation of those moral precepts ... in which all religions agree."

"No power over the freedom of religion is delegated to the United States by the Constitution."

"Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty."

"I shall need, too, the favor of that Being in whose hands we are, who led our fathers, as Israel of old, from their native land and planted them in a country flowing with all the necessaries and comforts of life; who has covered our infancy with His providence and our riper years with His wisdom and power, and to whose goodness I ask you to join in supplications with me that He will so enlighten the minds of your servants, guide their councils, and prosper their measures that whatsoever they do shall result in your good, and shall secure to you the peace, friendship, and approbation of all nations."

The States can best govern our home concerns and the general government our foreign ones. I wish, therefore...never to see all offices transferred to Washington, where, further withdrawn from the eyes of the people, they may more secretly be bought and sold at market."

"Yes, we did produce a near perfect Republic. But will they keep it, or will they, in the enjoyment of plenty, lose the memory of freedom? Material abundance without character is the surest way to destruction."

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical. ... A wise and frugal government ... shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. ... Congress has not unlimited powers to provide for the general welfare but only those specifically enumerated. ... Would it not be better to simplify the system of taxation rather than to spread it over such a variety of subjects and pass through so many new hands?"

"It is unfortunate that the efforts of mankind to recover the freedom of which they have been so long deprived, will be accompanied with violence, with errors, and even with crimes. But while we weep over the means, we must pray for the end."  Thomas Jefferson to Francois D'Ivernois, 1795

"Government can do something for the people only in proportion as it can do something to the people."


James Madison - Author of the Constitution - Do these quotes from James Madison sound like he intended Separation of Church and State the way the People For the American Way or the ACLU is deceiving us?

"We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not upon the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government; upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God."

"No people ought to feel greater obligations to celebrate the goodness of the Great Disposer of Events and of the Destiny of Nations than the people of the United States." (In his proclamation of a National Day of Thanksgiving in 1815.)

"Before any man can be considered as a member of civil society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe. Religion is the basis and foundation of government."'

James Madison, who wrote the First Amendment in the U.S. Constitution guaranteeing religious freedom, opined on the importance of religious freedom to a successful nation. In 1820, Madison wrote, "Equal laws, protecting equal rights, are found, as they ought to be, the best guarantee of loyalty and love of country, as well as best calculated to cherish that mutual respect and good will among citizens of every religious denomination which are necessary to social harmony."

"It is a principle incorporated into the settled policy of America, that as peace is better than war, war is better than tribute." (letter to the Dey of Algiers, August 1816)


John Jay, First Chief Justice of the Supreme Court - "Let a general reformation of manners take place--let universal charity, public spirit, and private virtue be inculcated, encouraged, and practiced.  Unite in preparing for a vigorous defense of your country, as if all depended on your own exertions.  And when you have done all things, then rely upon the good Providence of Almighty God for success, in full confidence that without his blessings, all our efforts will inevitably fail."

"The Bible is the best of all books, for it is the word of God and teaches us the way to be happy in this world and in the next. Continue therefore to read it and to regulate your life by its precepts." Letter to Peter Augustus Jay, April 9, 1784.

"The most effectual means of securing the continuance of our civil and religious liberties, is always to remember with reverence and gratitude the source from which they flow."


Abraham Lincoln - When a group of African-Americans presented him with the gift of a Bible, President Abraham Lincoln stated the following: "I believe the Bible is the best gift God has ever given to man All the good from the Saviour of the world is communicated through this Book; but for the Book we could not know right from wrong, All the things desirable to man are contained in it."

"We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven; we have grown in numbers, wealth, and power as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace and multiplied and enriched and  strengthened us, and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to fell the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us."

"We know that by His divine law, nations, like individuals, are subjected to punishments and chastisements in this world...We have grown in numbers, wealth, and power as no other nation has ever grown; but we have forgotten God."

"Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves, and, under a just God, cannot long retain it."

"I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. My own wisdom, and that of all about me, seemed insufficient for that day."


President Ulysses S. Grant, June 6, 1876 - "Hold fast to the Bible as the sheet anchor of your liberties; write its precepts in your hearts, and practice them in your lives."


Theodore Roosevelt - "Every thinking man, when he thinks, realizes that the teachings of the Bible are so interwoven and entwined with our whole civic and social life that it would be literally-I do not mean figuratively, but literally - impossible for us to figure what that loss would be if these teachings were removed. We would lose all the standards by which we now judge both public and private morals; all the standards towards which we, with more or less resolution, strive to raise ourselves."

"In this actual world, a churchless community, a community where men have abandoned and scoffed at or ignored their religious needs, is a community on a rapid down-grade."

"To educate a person in mind and not in morals is to educate a menace to society."

"Much has been given us from on high, and much will rightly be expected of us in return.  Into our care the ten talents have been entrusted; and we are to be pardoned neither if we squander and waste them, nor yet if we hide them in a napkin; for they must be fruitful in our hands.  Ever throughout the ages, at all times and among all peoples, prosperity has been fraught with danger, and it behooves us to beseech the Giver of all things that we may not fall into love of ease and luxury; that we may not lose our sense of moral responsibility; that we may not forget our duty to God, and to our neighbor."


Grover Cleveland- "All must admit that the reception of the teachings of Christ results in the purest patriotism, in the most scrupulous fidelity to public trust, and in the best type of citizenship."

Above all, I know there is a Supreme Being who rules the affairs of men and whose goodness and mercy have always followed the American people, and I know He will not turn from us now if we humbly and reverently seek His powerful aid. March 4, 1893

"The atonement of Jesus Christ is the only remedy and rest for my soul." President Grover Cleveland, 1860


Woodrow Wilson - "America was born to exemplify that devotion to the elements of righteousness which are derived from the revelations of the Holy Scripture."

 "The Bible...is the one supreme source of revelation of the meaning of life, the nature of God and spiritual nature and needs of men. It is the only guide of life which really leads the spirit in the way of peace and salvation. America was born a Christian nation. America was born to exemplify that devotion to the elements of righteousness which are derived from the revelations of Holy Scripture."

"The history of liberty is a history of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of limitations of governmental power, not the increase of it."  Speech in New York, Sept. 9, 1912

"America was born a Christian nation. America was born to exemplify that devotion to the elements of righteousness, which are derived from the revelations of Holy Scriptures. Part of the destiny of Americans lies in their daily perusal of this great book of revelations. That if they would see America free and pure they will make their own spirits free and pure by this baptism of the Holy Spirit." From his famous address: "The Bible and Progress," May 7. 1911, Denver, Colorado.

"The only way your powers can become great is by exerting them outside the circle of your own narrow, special, selfish interests. And that is the reason of Christianity. Christ came into the world to save others, not to save himself; and no man is a true Christian who does not think constantly of how he can lift his brother, how he can assist his friend, how he can enlighten mankind, how he can make virtue the rule of conduct in the circle in which he lives." October 24, 1914


Calvin Coolidge "The foundations of our society and our government rest so much on the teachings of the Bible that it would be difficult to support them if faith in these teachings would cease to be practically universal in our country."

"No other theory is adequate to explain or comprehend the Declaration of Independence. It is the product of the spiritual insight of the people. We live in an age of science and of abounding accumulation of material things. These did not create our Declaration. Our Declaration created them. The things of the Spirit come first. Unless we cling to that, all our material prosperity, overwhelming though it may appear, will turn to a barren scepter in our grasp. ..."Equality, liberty, popular sovereignty, the rights of man - these are not elements which we can see and touch. They are ideals. They have their source and their roots in the religious convictions. They belong to the unseen world. Unless the faith of the American people in these religious convictions is to endure, the principles of our Declaration will perish. We can not continue to enjoy the result if we neglect and abandon the cause." July 5, 1926 Philadelphia, PA

"America seeks no earthly empire built on blood and force. No ambition, no temptation, lures her to thought of foreign dominions. The legions which she sends forth are armed, not with the sword, but with the cross. The higher state to which she seeks the allegiance of all mankind is not of  human, but of divine origin. She cherishes no purpose save to merit the favor of Almighty God."

"We do not need more intellectual power, we need more moral power. We do not need more knowledge, we need more character. We do not need more government, we need more culture. We do not need more law, we need more religion. We do not need more of the things that are seen, we need more of the things that are unseen. If the foundation be firm, the foundation will stand."

"If our country secured any benefit, if it met with any gain, it must have been in moral and spiritual values. It must not be because it made its fortune but because it found its soul."

"It is only when men begin to worship that they begin to grow."

"The strength of our country is the strength of its religious convictions." President Calvin Coolidge, September 1923


U. S. Supreme Court, 1892 - "Our laws and our institutions must necessarily be based upon the teachings of the Redeemer of Mankind. It is impossible that it should be otherwise; and in this sense and to this extent, our civilization and our institutions are emphatically Christian."


Chief Justice Earl Warren - "I believe no one can read the history of our country without realizing that the Good Book and the spirit of the Savior have from the beginning been our guiding geniuses...I believe the entire Bill of Rights came into being because of the knowledge our forefathers had of the Bible and their belief in it."


Harry Truman - "The fundamental basis of this nation's law was given to Moses on the Mount. The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teaching we get from Exodus and St. Matthew, from Isaiah and St. Paul."

"I fear we are too much concerned with material things to remember that our real strength lies in spiritual values."


William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the United States - "I deem the present occasion sufficiently important and solemn to justify me in expressing to my fellow-citizens a profound reverence for the Christian religion and a thorough conviction that sound morals, religious liberty, and a just sense of religious responsibility are essentially connected with all true and lasting happiness; and to that good Being who has blessed us by the gifts of civil and religious freedom, who watched over and prospered the labors of our fathers and has hitherto preserved to us institutions far exceeding in excellence those of any other people, let us unite in fervently commending every interest of our beloved country in all future time." 


Franklin D. Roosevelt, radio broadcast 1935 - "We cannot read the history of our rise and development as a nation, without reckoning with the place the Bible has occupied in shaping the advances of the Republic. Where we have been the truest and most consistent in obeying its precepts, we have attained the greatest measure of contentment and prosperity."


Dwight D. Eisenhower - "Without God there could be no American form of government, nor an American way of life. Recognition of the Supreme Being is the first, the most basic, expression of Americanism."

American Minute for November 9th: On NOVEMBER 9, 1954, President Eisenhower addressed the National Conference on the Spiritual Foundation of American Democracy at the Sheraton-Carlton Hotel, Washington D.C.: "Now Dr. Lowry said something about my having certain convictions as to a God in Heaven and an Almighty power. Well, I don't think anyone needs a great deal of credit for believing in what seems to me to be obvious...This relationship between a spiritual faith...and our form of government is...so obvious that we should really not need to identify a man as unusual because he recognizes it." Eisenhower continued "Our whole theory of government finally expressed in our Declaration...said...Man is endowed by his Creator...When you come back to it, there is just one thing...that a man is worthwhile because he was born in the image of his God...Democracy is nothing in the world but a spiritual conviction...that each of us is enormously valuable, because of a certain standing before our own God." Eisenhower concluded: "Any group that...awakens all of us to these simple things...is, in my mind, a dedicated, patriotic group that can well take the Bible in one hand and the flag in the other, and march ahead."


John F. Kennedy - In his inaugural address, he said: "The rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it, and the glow from that fire can truly light the world. And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country...Let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own. There are risks and costs to a program of action. But they are far less than the long-range risks and costs of comfortable inaction." Also: "Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty."- In a speech to have been given November 22, 1963 These words were written by President John F. Kennedy that was to be delivered in Dallas, Texas. Kennedy never delivered the speech, but his written thoughts remain. "We in this country, in this generation, are by destiny rather than choice the watchman on the walls of world freedom. We ask therefore, that we may be worthy of our power and responsibility, that we may exercise our strength with wisdom and restraint, and that we may achieve in our time and for all time the ancient vision of peace on earth, goodwill toward men. That must always be our goal. For as was written long ago, 'Except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.'"  

American Minute for May 29th: Awarded the Navy's medal of heroism during World War II and the Pulitzer Prize for his book Profiles in Courage, he was the youngest elected President, serving just over 1,000 days before being shot. This was John F. Kennedy, born MAY 29, 1917. He stated in his Inaugural, January 20, 1961: "I have sworn before you and Almighty God the same solemn oath our forbears prescribed nearly a century and three quarters ago. The world is very different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe-The belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God." To President Quadros of Brazil, John F. Kennedy wrote January 31, 1961: "Once in every 20 years presidential inaugurations in your country and mine occur within days of each other. This year of 1961 is signalized by the happy coincidence. At this time, each of us assumes challenging duties...To each of us is entrusted the heavy responsibility of guiding the affairs of a democratic nation founded on Christian ideals."

American Minute for August 2: Navy torpedo boat PT 109 was rammed AUGUST 2, 1943, by a Japanese destroyer and sunk. The commander sustained permanent back injuries yet helped survivors swim miles to shore, which unfortunately was behind enemy lines in the Solomon Islands. After a daring rescue, he was awarded the Medal of heroism. Though one of his brothers was killed in the war, he went on to become a Congressman, Senator, and the 35th U.S. President. His name was John F. Kennedy, who stated in his Inaugural Address: "Let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own." In the White House Rose Garden, November 21, 1961, John F. Kennedy said: "When we all - regardless of our particular religious convictions - draw our guidance and inspiration, and really, in a sense, moral direction, from the same general area, the Bible, the Old and the New Testaments, we have every reason to believe that our various religious denominations should live together in the closest harmony." Kennedy concluded: "The basic presumption of the moral law, the existence of God, man's relationship to Him - there is generally consensus on those questions."


Andrew Johnson

"Let us look forward to the time when we can take the flag of our country and nail it below the Cross, and there let it wave as it waved in the olden times, and let us gather around it and inscribe for our motto: 

"Liberty and Union, one and inseparable, now and forever, and exclaim:  Christ first, our country next!"

 


Back to America's Christian Heritage Index


Home | About | Search | Newsletter | Contact