He That Has Ears To Hear, Let Him Hear

Archived: Last Updated Decenber 27, 2004
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Re-Writing History

The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History The PC Crowd Has Rewritten U.S. History, But This History Book Is Different: It's True One of the first things Stalin, Hitler, Mao and other totalitarians did was rewrite the histories of their nations, remaking the past to foster their control of the present. The American Left has done the same thing in our country: most American history books - both for students and adults -- are riddled with PC nonsense that makes the Founding Fathers over into racist slaveholders, the settlers of the West into genocidal land-stealers, and the welfare state into the harbinger of the ultimate triumph of liberalism. But now at last conservatives and patriotic Americans have an antidote: The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History is a handy one-volume guide to our nation's glorious past that has one key advantage over today's dozens of dreary PC history books: this one tells you what really happened -- not what liberals wish had happened. From the Puritans through the drafting of the Constitution, the Civil War, the World Wars, the rise of the "Great Society" all the way up through the fiasco of the Clinton Administration, this brightly written book gives you the whole truth and nothing but the truth about our great nation: history professor Thomas E. Woods presents the Founding Fathers as the visionary heroes they were; discusses the real causes of the Civil War and World War I fairly and objectively; and examines in depth the ravages of statism, high taxes, and the war against American initiative.

Senate Panel Hears that Ignorance of U.S. History Poses Major Security Threat

By Fred Jackson and Jody Brown
April 11, 2003

(AgapePress) - A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author is warning that widespread ignorance of American history among students and teachers at high schools and colleges is a major threat to the nation's security.

David McCullough sounded that alarm on Thursday in an appearance before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. He said "we are raising a generation of people who are historically illiterate" and ignorant of the basic philosophical foundations of America's constitutional free society.

According to McCullough, who is a past president of the Society of American Historians, American citizens cannot function in a society if they do not know who they are and from where they came. He said only three colleges in the United States require a course on the Constitution in order to graduate -- and those are the three major military academies (the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, the Naval Academy at Annapolis, and the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs).

The historian stated that when asked to identify the commanding general of American revolutionary troops at Yorktown when British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered, more than half of a group of high school students guessed Civil War figure Ulysses S. Grant. Six percent, he said, conjectured it was Douglas MacArthur, who served as Supreme Allied Commander of the Southwest Pacific theater during World War II.

And McCullough added that when there are students at Ivy League colleges saying they thought Germany and Japan were American allies in World War II, the nation has a very serious problem.

The Washington Times notes other speakers who appeared before the panel voiced similar concerns. (Article Below)

Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who chairs the Senate committee, has proposed legislation that would create summertime "presidential academies" for American history and civics teachers, and "congressional academies" for students of American history and civics.

2003 AgapePress all rights reserved

Ignorance of U.S. history called threat to security
By George Archibald
THE WASHINGTON TIMES

     Widespread ignorance of American history among students and teachers at high schools and colleges is a major threat to the nation's security, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author David McCullough told a Senate panel yesterday.

     "We are raising a generation of people who are historically illiterate" and ignorant of the basic philosophical foundations of our constitutional free society, the past president of the Society of American Historians said.
     "We can't function in a society if we don't know who we are and where we came from," Mr. McCullough told a special hearing of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. The panel is chaired by Sen. Lamar Alexander, Tennessee Republican.
     Mr. McCullough said a group of high school students was asked if they could name the American Revolutionary War commanding general at Yorktown when British Gen. Charles Cornwallis surrendered. "More than half guessed Ulysses S. Grant. More than 6 percent said it was Douglas MacArthur. They were guessing," he said.
     "Why is it important if you don't know the facts about Yorktown? It means you have no idea it was the last battle of the Revolutionary War the longest war in our history except the Vietnam War. Why is it important to know who George Washington is?" he said. "If it hadn't been for George Washington, we wouldn't have won the Revolutionary War. Without George Washington, we wouldn't have the Constitution that we have and we wouldn't have the presidency that we have."
     Mr. McCullough's most recent work is on Founding Father John Adams, which won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for biography.
     He said only three colleges in the United States require a course on the Constitution in order to graduate: the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, the Naval Academy at Annapolis and the Air Force Academy.
     "We need to know the Constitution, and we don't. When you have students at our Ivy League colleges saying they thought Germany and Japan were our allies in World War II, you know we've got a very serious problem," Mr. McCullough testified.
     Mr. Alexander, who was education secretary under the first Bush administration, noted the reluctance of many teachers to promote the country's religious and patriotic heritage. He asked Mr. McCullough if students should be taught that America is an "exceptional" country.
     "Yes, we're an exceptional people," the historian responded. "The American story is exceptional. The American Revolution was the first revolution of a people breaking away from a colonial power and establishing a free country."
     The hearing was called to promote Mr. Alexander's proposed legislation to create federally funded two-week summer presidential academies for American history and civics teachers and four-week summer congressional academies for students of American history and civics.
     Mr. Alexander said students don't know these subjects because they are not being taught. "American history has been watered down and civics is too often dropped from the curriculum entirely," he said.
     He said the purpose of the proposed academies "would be to inspire better teaching and more learning of the key events, persons and ideas that shape the institutions and democratic heritage of the United States."
     Sen. Robert C. Byrd, West Virginia Democrat, praised the proposal, saying that minimal state learning standards have dropped in recent years.
     Bruce Cole, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, called widespread ignorance of history "our American amnesia."
     Eugene W. Hickok, undersecretary of education, said only 10 percent of high school students scored at the "proficient" level on the history test administered in 2001 by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, a national testing program that states are required to administer in schools that accept federal funding from grades three to eight.
     Much of the poor performance is because "too much of the history taught in our schools is compressed and diluted within broader social studies curricula," he said. "It is impossible for even the best-trained teacher to do justice to the full sweep of America's history in a curriculum that also covers such topics as geography, the environment, conflict resolution and world cultures."
     Diane Ravitch, research professor of education at New York University, said she is encouraged that the study of history "has been making a comeback."
     Ten years ago, only California, Massachusetts, Texas and Virginia had history standards to guide teachers, she said. "Today, after 10 years of popular support for academic standards, about half the states now have history standards."